Jamie Boogies
Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else.

Isaac Asimov  

Maybe the best definition of happiness I’ve ever seen.

(via perpetualtoska)
If you say so…

If you say so…

Egg carton tomato seedling

Egg carton tomato seedling

sally-thtgurl:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

sally-thtgurl:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

anders-wo:

Proud to be a Beloiter.

Doppelgänger

If you’re so inclined, you can now follow my other self on Tumblr:

jamie-kelly.tumblr.com

He posts about cultural heritage and museums and stuff.

… “stuff” being the technical term for the objects he cares for.

He’s also on twitter: twitter.com/jamiekelly

jamie-kelly:

The Field Museum and members of Chicago’s Filipino American community have an opportunity to digitally photograph approximately 8,000 artifacts from The Field’s Philippine Anthropology collection and upload the images and information onto a custom web portal or “wiki” to allow the public to…

thebrainscoop:

This is StarStuff. 
The cloudy, nebulousness of this vial are nanodiamonds, carbon molecules only a thousand atoms strong, bonded together. During the formation of our solar system a cloud of dust ballooned from the collapse of a massive molecular cloud and was circling around what would be our new, baby sun. These carbon atoms were trapped within larger molecules and compounds and became inclusions, embedded within meteorites which would become evidence of the earliest solids that condensed from the cooling of protoplanetary disks.
The Field Museum has part of the oldest known meteorite - the Allende meteorite - from which these carbon nanodiamonds were extracted through chemical processes developed by Philipp Heck, our Curator of Meteoritics. We know how old the solar system is by dating these inclusions from the Allende meteorite, giving us an estimate that our solar system is 4.567 billion years old. The carbon atoms I’m holding in the above photo are, in a sense, our greatest ancestor, and ultimately became the building blocks for all life on our planet. 
TL;DR I’m holding our greatest ancestor in the palm of my hand.

thebrainscoop:

This is StarStuff. 

The cloudy, nebulousness of this vial are nanodiamonds, carbon molecules only a thousand atoms strong, bonded together. During the formation of our solar system a cloud of dust ballooned from the collapse of a massive molecular cloud and was circling around what would be our new, baby sun. These carbon atoms were trapped within larger molecules and compounds and became inclusions, embedded within meteorites which would become evidence of the earliest solids that condensed from the cooling of protoplanetary disks.

The Field Museum has part of the oldest known meteorite - the Allende meteorite - from which these carbon nanodiamonds were extracted through chemical processes developed by Philipp Heck, our Curator of Meteoritics. We know how old the solar system is by dating these inclusions from the Allende meteorite, giving us an estimate that our solar system is 4.567 billion years old. The carbon atoms I’m holding in the above photo are, in a sense, our greatest ancestor, and ultimately became the building blocks for all life on our planet. 

TL;DR I’m holding our greatest ancestor in the palm of my hand.

whenyouworkatamuseum:

Not looking to incite a partisan debate, but today President Obama said some stuff about the value of an art history degree.

Is he wrong about those little paychecks? Nope, we’ve talked about this before. We didn’t get into this for money. And some of what he says is true- not everyone…