Jamie Boogies
DAMMIT You’re Old!

Perhaps I’m too busy laughing off the ribbing I get from friends and family, but for me age-awareness-induced anxiety has not overcome me on my birthdays. Usually that sort of anxiety is brought on when I find out the year my interns were born… You were born AFTER Kurt Cobain died?! STILL, what better way to eulogize someone you love than on their 40th birthday.

Mike and I (along with our dear friend and my wife Angie) have known each other since our first week of college. I’ll save the cute and mildly embarrassing photos of him for some other milestone, such his wake (J/K!). (Besides finding these on the Interwebs is fairly easy. Just between Angie , Mike, and me, you could see some here and here and here and here and here and here and here.)

To this day it’s hard to articulate what it is about Mike, but he has a seemingly easy social grace with people and is able to draw you in. I’m loathe to characterize it as JUST charisma (CHA = 18, COM = 18, WIS = 16, STR = 6…), but you always feel engaged and connected to him, especially when in conversation. As a mild introvert, I love his gregariousness. His ease of conversation. His tremendous gift for storytelling. His wonderful sense of humor and love of puns. His caring, giving, and support of others. For a year when we rented a “stately” apartment together our senior year of college, I was Felix to his Oscar. (Or was it the other way around? I was having too much of a great time to remember.) We were best men in one other’s weddings. And now we’re having a wonderful time sharing in the joys and challenges of parenthood as we watch our children grow into this wild world we all inhabit. Needless to say, it will be a trip (some of it anxiety riddled!) to watch them go through college (in less than ten years!) during the point of their lives when Mike and I met and forged our friendship. Here’s to at many, many more years of that friendship. With all best wishes, Mike. Happy Birthday!

yeahhappy:

Showing the size of her brain.

Pockets (our dog) had the smallest brain.

Daddy (@jamieboogies) has the hugest brain.

According to her.

Well, she is an expert on these things so who’s to argue.

yeahhappy:

Showing the size of her brain.

Pockets (our dog) had the smallest brain.

Daddy (@jamieboogies) has the hugest brain.

According to her.

Well, she is an expert on these things so who’s to argue.

Maybe happiness is this: not feeling like you should be elsewhere, doing something else, being someone else.

Isaac Asimov  

Maybe the best definition of happiness I’ve ever seen.

(via perpetualtoska)
If you say so…

If you say so…

Egg carton tomato seedling

Egg carton tomato seedling

sally-thtgurl:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

sally-thtgurl:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

anders-wo:

Proud to be a Beloiter.

Doppelgänger

If you’re so inclined, you can now follow my other self on Tumblr:

jamie-kelly.tumblr.com

He posts about cultural heritage and museums and stuff.

… “stuff” being the technical term for the objects he cares for.

He’s also on twitter: twitter.com/jamiekelly

jamie-kelly:

The Field Museum and members of Chicago’s Filipino American community have an opportunity to digitally photograph approximately 8,000 artifacts from The Field’s Philippine Anthropology collection and upload the images and information onto a custom web portal or “wiki” to allow the public to…

thebrainscoop:

This is StarStuff. 
The cloudy, nebulousness of this vial are nanodiamonds, carbon molecules only a thousand atoms strong, bonded together. During the formation of our solar system a cloud of dust ballooned from the collapse of a massive molecular cloud and was circling around what would be our new, baby sun. These carbon atoms were trapped within larger molecules and compounds and became inclusions, embedded within meteorites which would become evidence of the earliest solids that condensed from the cooling of protoplanetary disks.
The Field Museum has part of the oldest known meteorite - the Allende meteorite - from which these carbon nanodiamonds were extracted through chemical processes developed by Philipp Heck, our Curator of Meteoritics. We know how old the solar system is by dating these inclusions from the Allende meteorite, giving us an estimate that our solar system is 4.567 billion years old. The carbon atoms I’m holding in the above photo are, in a sense, our greatest ancestor, and ultimately became the building blocks for all life on our planet. 
TL;DR I’m holding our greatest ancestor in the palm of my hand.

thebrainscoop:

This is StarStuff. 

The cloudy, nebulousness of this vial are nanodiamonds, carbon molecules only a thousand atoms strong, bonded together. During the formation of our solar system a cloud of dust ballooned from the collapse of a massive molecular cloud and was circling around what would be our new, baby sun. These carbon atoms were trapped within larger molecules and compounds and became inclusions, embedded within meteorites which would become evidence of the earliest solids that condensed from the cooling of protoplanetary disks.

The Field Museum has part of the oldest known meteorite - the Allende meteorite - from which these carbon nanodiamonds were extracted through chemical processes developed by Philipp Heck, our Curator of Meteoritics. We know how old the solar system is by dating these inclusions from the Allende meteorite, giving us an estimate that our solar system is 4.567 billion years old. The carbon atoms I’m holding in the above photo are, in a sense, our greatest ancestor, and ultimately became the building blocks for all life on our planet. 

TL;DR I’m holding our greatest ancestor in the palm of my hand.